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Monday, October 22, 2012

THE RED NORVO SEPTET / ANN WELDON 

STARS OF JAZZ - AUGUST 27, 1956 - SHOW #10

COMMENTARY © James A. Harrod, Copyright Protected; All Rights Reserved


The TV Guide listing for the August 27, 1956  Stars of Jazz program did not mention that Red Norvo’s group included seven members or that the guest vocalist was Ann Weldon.  Red Norvo had recently recorded an album for the Liberty label.  John Tynan’s NITERY NOTES in the September 5, 1956 issue of Down Beat noted that Norvo’s trio had been engaged at the Harbor Inn in Santa Monica:

NITERY NOTES: Howard Rumsey's Lighthouse All-Stars welcomed back Conte Candoli to the stand .at the Hermosa jazz bastion . . . Anita O'Day is back in town at Jazz City ... The facile Dave Pell octet alternates on-stand at the Hollywood & Western spot . . . Up the street at Vine, "Queen Dee" Dinah Washington, aided by the Buddy DeFranco quintet, sheds some of that unique warmth in Zardi's Jazzland . . . Teddy Buckner's horn is skedded for an airing soon on KABC-TV's Stars of Jazz show dishing out a sample of what he's putting down every night at the 400 club . . . Shelly Manne & Men continue unabashed at the Tiffany . . . At Santa Monica's Harbor inn, the jumping Red Norvo trio prevails. Buddy Clark, bass, and Jim Wyble, guitar, complete Red's triangle.


VIBE-RATIONS - RED NORVO IN HI-FI (Liberty LJH 3012 was the twelfth and next to last release in Liberty’s “Jazz In Hollywood” series that had been launched by Harry Babasin when Liberty bought the defunct Nocturne label and hired Babasin to integrate some of the Nocturne masters into the Liberty catalogue.  The septet members appearing on Stars of Jazz were the same except for Bill Dillard, the guitarist, who had perished in a fire weeks after the Liberty album was recorded and Buddy Clark who replaced Gene Wright on bass.  The septet opens the program with a slow blues while Troup delivers his introduction and sets the stage for Norvo’s first number, SWEET GEORGIA BROWN.  The septet next performs IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU followed by Ann Weldon performing YOU MAKE ME FEEL SO YOUNG and WHATEVER LOLA WANTS. The Norvo septet closes the show with FASCINATING RHYTHM and then they return to the slow blues as Troup winds down the program with closing credits and announcements.  The Norvo septet backs Ann Weldon on her numbers.

The liner notes for the Liberty album supply some of Norvo’s background:

That Red Norvo now wears a beard (which makes him look somewhat like one of Saul Steinberg's cats) has nothing whatever to do with his having been born Kenneth Norville about forty-seven years ago in Beardstown, Illinois, but it is symbolic of his standing as one of the evergreen geniuses of jazz.


Red was in Chicago in the late twenties when Eddie Condon and that bunch were, and although it was difficult for him to wheel his instrument, then the xylophone (Red says "zillaphone"), to the sessions at which they drank bad gin and played much music that was probably almost as bad but sounded great partly because it was fresh and exciting (and partly because of the gin), he nevertheless won the respect of all, even that of the staid Goodman, who later hired him when he was between combinations of his own; and at the risk of challenging the Times' Gilbert Millstein's title of World's Longest-Opening-Paragraph Writer, I must add that Red continued to grow and grow until the kids who play progressive began to pay strict awestruck attention to his work on the vibes (which replaced the "zillaphone"), a continuing homage which he has acknowledged by uttering the beard.


Few other musicians can make that claim, let alone that transition. Dave Tough tried; in Leonard Feather's sensitive view, he became so confused that his dilemma was one of the causes of his death. 

Red Norvo, on the other hand, the man whose name sounds like a handy household rat poison ("I've got to put some Red Norvo in those holes in the barn," one can imagine a farmer saying), has made the transition, as these sides adequately prove. I don't want to talk about the music except to say that it is strikingly representative of the personality of its creator: I am no musician, and it speaks for itself, swinging with lightness of touch beautifully fitting for the profound and humorous imagination that conceives it. I have spent the happiest times I've ever had with jazz listening to Red Norvo play, and I have had some of the happiest times I've ever had with another human being listening to Red Norvo talk. I want to talk about Red the human being.



Two stories catch him. In the summer of 1956, when I was in Hollywood on some magazine jobs, I went to hear him every night I could make it at Ken Brown's place in Santa Monica. I would sit there marveling as he played "Rhee! Oh Rhee!" (my favorite) and the rest, and between sets we would sit around and talk about the days seven or eight years ago when he was playing at the Embers in New York and after hours he and I and Eddi

Condon would go to a Chinese restaurant where the proprietor would bring us a teapot full of what Condon always called "slant-eyed whiskey." After the playing and reminiscing were over-I'm talking about the Hollywood visit again—Red and I would go out somewhere and eat. One night I noticed that he was strangely quiet. I didn't want to ask what was wrong. He is sometimes shy, I thought this was one of his shy nights, and he couldn't bring himself to say much (in that Embers period, he often thought

of more to say than some of us felt was necessary; but he had not yet gone on the wagon, then). We ate, said good night, and he went over to his house in Santa Monica and I went back to my hotel. The next evening he apologized. He said, "I'm sorry for being so quiet last night. We had to take our little boy to the hospital yesterday. It was sort of serious. I started to tell you about it but then I knew you'd worry and I didn't want to spoil your evening."



That is one side of him. Adjectives may now be filled in at random, and all the noble ones will do.



The other side falls into focus, like a stereopticon slide, in a story he told me about a youngster of seventeen or eighteen who—well, let me attempt to approximate Red's speech:



"This kid's been after me to teach him. He's like apple-cheeked, he's so young. He went to the Newport Jazz Festival, and when he got back I asked him whom he'd heard there that he liked. He said, well, nobody much, but yes, there was this old guy there, this old bopster. He couldn't think of his name. I thought, old bopster? Who could that be? Come on, think of his name, I told the kid. Gee. I can't, he said. Oh, he was fine this old bopster. Then he told me who it was. Miles Davis!" Red nearly fell off his chair laughing. So did I.


The best way to kick a story apart is to explain it, but for the exclusive benefit of Evan Hunter and Stanford Whatever-his-name is, author of Solo, it perhaps should be explained here that no bopster is an old one (except perhaps Red), and that Miles Davis is ... well, let it go, let it go.

That's Red. Here, on these selections, is the man's music. He has augmented his trio with Jack Montrose, who plays tenor, second flute and clarinet; Bob Drasnin, first flute: Bill Kosinski, English horn; and Bill Douglass, drums. Eugene Wright plays bass, and Bill Dillard, who was burned to death a few weeks after these sides were recorded, is the guitarist and composer, with Red, of "Rhee! Oh Rhee!" and "Porsche." The sides were made May 28, 1956. Like everything else about Norvo, they are remarkable, and it is my great pleasure to commend them to everyone who loves jazz.

RICHARD GEHMAN - Liner notes from Liberty LJH 6012.
(Novelist and magazine article writer, Richard Gehman is co-editor, with Eddie Condon, of the book EDDIE CONDON'S TREASURY OF JAZZ.)

The vocalist on the August 29, 1956 program, Ann Weldon, made a single appearance on Stars of Jazz. She continued her acreer as a vocalist as noted in her biography at her website:


Ann Weldon was born on a farm in Holdenville, Oklahoma where she watched her father milk their own cows to make butter; her mother took feathers from their ducks and chickens to make mattresses for their beds, she made quilts from their old clothes and fruit from their trees to can for the winter months; her father made syrup from the sugar cane he grew, and gathered honey from their own bee hives. These childhood memories have left fond impressions on Ann Weldon. However, it was the move to Bakersfield, CA at the age of nine that would open up her mind to another kind of world: an invitation from her new school to participate in the performing arts introduced her to the world of singing. Upon her first few performances around the age of 15, the audience's responses convinced her that singing was an undeniable career choice. Her first professional job started in the Mo Mo Club in Sacramento, and from there she went to the Moulin Rouge in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ann remembers that it was her mother who subtly pushed her career while her father enjoyed it. Though her sister Maxine and brother Charles proved to be musical as well and are now both active in show business, it was truly Ann that blazed the trail. 

Ann grew up admiring Dinah Washington, Rosemary Clooney and Sarah Vaughn. She knew quite early on what she wanted to do and her talent was quickly recognized by critics. To quote the late John Wasserman: "Ann Weldon has an exquisite, smokey alto voice, as lush as sable, excellent taste, and is one of the finest interpreters of lyrics I've ever heard." Time Magazine has written, " The tall cinnamon-skinned girl has a voice like velvet- soft, rich and shimmering; her tunes chosen with care and treated with respect." She has dazzled audiences in Australia, Hawaii, Japan, Manila, Germany, Amsterdam, Las Vegas, Reno, Los Angeles, New York, and at the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco.

It was Ann's intensely personal and dramatic way with performing a song that marked her as an actress long before she ever stepped onto a legitimate stage. In fact, this quality brought her to the attention of Bill Ball, artistic director of The American Theatre, where she has the distinction of being their first black leading lady. There, she starred as Dorine in "Tartuffe," Charmian in " Anthony and Cleopatra," Nerissa in "The Merchant of Venice," and Serafina in "The Rose Tattoo." Under the direction of Gower Champian, Ann played Serrita in Feydau's "Flea in Her Ear" at the Anta Theatre on Broadway and Bloody Mary in "South Pacific" at the Brundage Theatre in Arizona. Afterward, she returned to A.C.T. and L.A.T.C. to star as "Ma" in August Wilson's Pulitzer Prize winning play "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom." More recently, Ann was nominated for NAACP's Best Actress Award for her starring role in Cheryl West's "Jar The Floor" and Regina Taylor's "Crowns.”

Her television credits are many, including: "9 to 5," produced by Jane Fonda, "Roots," "Days of our Lives," "Woman Called Moses," starring Cicely Tyson; "Different Worlds," the "Robert Guillaume Show," "Hunter," "Franks Place," "Roc," "ER," "Martin," "High Incident," "In The House" and "Columbo." Her most rewarding experience came when she played Diana Ross's mother in "Out of Darkness", and the mother-in-law to Alfre Woodard in "What's Cooking." Other movie credits include: "Panthers" Mario Van Peebles and Clint Eastwood's "Bird." She has also done commercial voice overs for: Nissan, Pacific Bell, Borghese, Boeing and McDonalds.

An avid reader and researcher, Ann finds fulfillment in speaking at schools on topics of the contributions made by women and African Americans to science. When not working, she enjoys walking in the woods, educating herself, and watching Rachel Maddow and Keith Olbermann on MSNBC. She feels that A.C.T. gave her a new direction, a new career, a new life. Her success as a singer and actress has proven to her that there are opportunities in the arts for anyone with ambition and talent, regardless of their background or training.


Jack Montrose, Bill Kosinski, Bob Drasnin, Red Norvo


Show #10
AUGUST 27, 1956
The Red Norvo Septet: Jack Montrose, Robert Drasnin, reeds; Bill Kosinski, French horn; Red Norvo, vibraphone; Jimmy Wyble, guitar; Buddy Clark bass; Bill Douglass, drums. Ann Weldon, vocal.

Production credits:
Host: Bobby Troup
Executive Producer: Pete Robinson
Producer: Jimmie Baker
Director: Don Whitman
Technical Director: Al Haywood
Lighting Director: Vincent Cilurzo
Audio Engineer: Chuck Lewis
Video Engineer: Tom Sumner
Cameramen: Sal Folino, Jack Denton

The production script of show #10 in the Jimmie Baker archive was a copy of a copy and the did not photocopy very well.














The ABC network granted permission to the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service to distribute the Stars of Jazz shows to armed forces overseas via their transcription service. The AFRTS guidelines stipulated that all commercial content had to be removed from the program.  Thus the commercial spots for Budweiser Beer and Schweppes Quinine Water were removed by the transcription service.  The August 27, 1956 program was Show #5 in the AFRTS series, transcription master #AF-6867 dated August 16, 1957.

The photos that greatly enhance this presentation have been provided courtesy of the Ray Avery Estate.  The author would like to extend a most heartfelt thanks to Cynthia Sesso, Licensing Administrator of the Ray Avery Photo Archives.  Please note that these photos remain the property of the Ray Avery Estate and are used here with permission.  Any inquiries regarding their use, commercial or otherwise, should be directed to:  Cynthia Sesso at CTSIMAGES.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

THE DAVE PELL OCTET / MARCIE MILLER 


STARS OF JAZZ - AUGUST 20, 1956 - SHOW #9

COMMENTARY © James A. Harrod, Copyright Protected; All Rights Reserved


The August 20 copy for Stars of Jazz in TV Guide gave a full listing of the members of The Dave Pell Octet who would be the special guests on the program: Dave Pell, tenor sax; Jack Sheldon, trumpet; Ray Sims, trombone; Marty Berman, baritone sax, Paul Moer, piano; Frank Capp, drums; Bob Bates, bass and Tom Tedesco, guitar.  The featured vocalist, Marcie Miller, was not mentioned.  The copy also noted that the octet would play “HOW ARE THINGS IN GLOCCA MORA?” and MOUNTAIN GREENERY.”  The Dave Pell Octet was appearing at Jazz City, alternating sets with Anita O’Day. Although TV Guide noted Marty Paich as being on piano with the octet, photos from Ray Avery's archive confirm that it is Paul Moer at the piano.  Paich might have been on the set as well playing some of the musical examples such as the Bach fugue.


The Dave Pell Octet’s first album was for Albert Marx’s Trend record label playing the compositions of Irving Berlin with arrangements by Shorty Rogers and Wes Hensel.  The octet followed that successful outing with two more LPs exploring individual composers, Burke & Van Heusen on Kapp KL 1034 and Rodgers & Hart on Trend TL 1501 also released on Kapp KL 1025.  With this trio of albums The Dave Pell Octet initiated the jazz trend to celebrate individual composers.  The short list of arrangers who wrote for the octet included: Shorty Rogers, Marty Paich, Wes Hensel and Johnny Mandel.

Nesuhi Ertegun recruited Shorty Rogers as A&R head for Atlantic Records when Nesuhi joined his brother, Ahmet, at Atlantic.  Shorty in turn recruited west coast musicians to add a different flavor to the Atlantic jazz catalogue. In between recording “Jazz In Romantic Places” and “Love Story” for Atlantic, Dave Pell went into the recording studios at Capitol to make “I Had The Craziest Dream” with the octet.  Dave signed with RCA Victor in 1956 and recorded a series of albums with the octet whose members changed, but Dave always had the cream of Hollywood’s jazz community anxious to play in the octet and fill an empty chair.


Marcie Miller was the featured vocalist with the Ray Anthony orchestra when she made her appearance on Stars of Jazz.  Like many of the songbirds who appeared on the show, Marcie never made an album under her own name but appeared on wax with the Ray Anthony orchestra.

The bust of J. S. Bach from a Ray Avery proof sheet © Ray Avery/CTSIMAGES


Production credits:
Host: Bobby Troup
Executive Producer: Pete Robinson
Producer: Jimmie Baker
Director: Don Whitman
Technical Director: Al Haywood
Lighting Director: Vincent Cilurzo
Audio Engineer: Chuck Lewis
Video Engineer: Gene Lukowski
Cameramen: Sal Folino, Jack Denton
Art Director: Edgar Lansbury













The ABC network granted permission to the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service to distribute the Stars of Jazz shows to armed forces overseas via their transcription service. The AFRTS guidelines stipulated that all commercial content had to be removed from the program.  Thus the commercial spots for Budweiser Beer and Schweppes Quinine Water were removed by the transcription service.  The August 20, 1956 program was Show #4 in the AFRTS series, transcription master #AF-6866 dated August 9, 1957.


The photos that greatly enhance this presentation have been provided courtesy of the Ray Avery Estate.  The author would like to extend a most heartfelt thanks to Cynthia Sesso, Licensing Administrator of the Ray Avery Photo Archives.  Please note that these photos remain the property of the Ray Avery Estate and are used here with permission.  Any inquiries regarding their use, commercial or otherwise, should be directed to:  Cynthia Sesso at CTSIMAGES.


Tuesday, October 9, 2012

BILLIE HOLIDAY / CORKY HALE - PETE JOLLY TRIO


STARS OF JAZZ - AUGUST 13, 1956 - SHOW #8

COMMENTARY © James A. Harrod, Copyright Protected; All Rights Reserved



The TV Guide listing for the August 13, 1956 Stars of Jazz show noted that the Pete Jolly Trio would be appearing with members Pete Jolly, piano; Bob Neel, drums and Bob Bertaux on bass (Neel’s named is often incorrectly given as Neal).  For reasons unknown the TV Guide did not include the appearance of one of the greatest jazz vocalists of all time, Billie Holiday.  The Pete Jolly Trio and Billie Holiday were alternating sets at Jazz City.  At this point in time Jazz City at 5510 Hollywood Boulevard where it meets Western Avenue was the dominant jazz club in Los Angeles.  If the Miles Davis Quintet was coming to Los Angeles, they would be booked at Jazz City.

Billie Holiday was accompanied on piano by Corky Hale who had appeared previously on Stars of Jazz as the featured vocalist opposite Shelly Manne and His Men on the July 16, 1956 broadcast of the program.  Following her appearance on Stars of Jazz, Corky was approached by Jerry Grey asking her to come to Las Vegas to sing and play piano for his band during a summer engagement.  On the first day of rehearsal Grey told Corky that they had booked a last minute act who would be appearing with them that evening, and Billie Holiday joined the band on the rehearsal stage.  Billie was used to being accompanied by the likes of Oscar Peterson or Jimmy Rowles and was a bit skeptical when she saw the young blonde Corky at the keyboard.  That skepticism vanished during the rehearsal as Corky demonstrated her deft skill at backing a vocalist.  Billie told Corky that “You is my little girl” and asked Corky to come to Los Angeles for her engagement at Jazz City and the appearance on Stars of Jazz.  Bob Neel and Bob Bertaux provided rhythm back up for Corky as she accompanied Billie on the show.

Billie Holiday’s appearance on Stars of Jazz was near the end of her career, she would pass away three years later on July 17, 1959.  Her recording career spanned the two previous decades and major record labels like Commodore, Decca, Columbia and Norman Granz’s Mercury, Clef, Norgran and Verve labels.  Her album covers by artist David Stone Martin are among the most memorable and distinctive in her career, and fans cherish mint copies of these highly sought after releases.

Pete Jolly would appear on Stars of Jazz six times during the two and a half years the show was on the air as featured soloist as well as filling the piano chair in other groups appearing on the show.  The August 13, 1956 show was his first time on the show and he was the featured instrumental jazz artist with his trio.  Jolly had quickly become a part of the west coast jazz scene in Los Angeles after relocating to the west coast from Arizona.  His first recording contract was with RCA Victor and by the time that he appeared on Stars of Jazz Jolly had four LPs in release as leader.

Jimmie Baker was the “hands on” producer who put together each show.  He would meet with the executive producer, Pete Robinson, and the writer, Bob Arbogast to formulate the story line that would tie the show together, and he would meet with the jazz artists in advance of the show to discuss the music to be performed, song selection and duration.  The thirty minute “live show” had to be scripted down to the second, no room for an extra chorus, or an extended solo unless it was in the script.  There had to be time slots to feature the sponsors message and the show had to wind down on time so as not to encroach on the next program in the evening schedule. If a guest was taking too long to respond to a question, Bobby Troup had to be ready to cut them off, politely. 

Jimmie Baker was a frequent guest at Ken Poston’s Los Angeles Jazz Institute events.  A special presentation of Jimmie’s Stars of Jazz and Jazz Scene USA productions was held at the LAJI “Cool and Crazy” event in May of 2002.  Ken Poston conducted an interview with Jimmie and at one point asked Jimmie to recall any special occasion or highlight that remained in his mind regarding the Stars of Jazz series.  Jimmie quickly replied that having Billie Holiday on the show was the peak experience for him.  He recalled that after meeting with Billie to discuss her musical numbers he asked if he could do anything for her during the remainder of the afternoon.  Billie said that she would love to see Hollywood.  Jimmie had a convertible at the time and they set off driving the avenues and boulevards that made Beverly Hills and Hollywood famous.  Jimmie drove the length of Mullholland Drive and Billie marveled at the expanse of Los Angeles.  When Jimmie finished his reminiscence of that afternoon with Billie Holiday he had tears in his eyes. 

The above photo by Howard Morehead is © Howard Morehead Collection/CAAM.  Morehead was a frequent visitor to the stage of Stars of Jazz as were William Claxton and Ray Avery, both of whom were present and took photos of this edition of Stars of Jazz featuring Billie Holiday.


Billie Holiday on Stars of Jazz

The production script of this show is missing from the Jimmie Baker archive. The following credits are taken from the YouTube video. 

Production credits: 
Host: Bobby Troup
Executive Producer: Pete Robinson 
Producer: Jimmie Baker 
Director: Don Whitman 
Technical Director: Al Hayward 
Lighting Director: Vincent Cilurzo 
Audio Engineer: Chuck Lewis 
Video Engineer: Gene Lukowski 
Cameramen: Sal Folino, Jack Denton 
Art Director: Edgar Lansbury 



The ABC network granted permission to the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service to distribute the Stars of Jazz shows to armed forces overseas via their transcription service. The AFRTS guidelines stipulated that all commercial content had to be removed from the program.  Thus the commercial spots for Budweiser Beer and Schweppes Quinine Water were removed by the transcription service.  The August 13, 1956 program was Show #3 in the AFRTS series, transcription master #AF-6727 dated August 2, 1957.



The photos that greatly enhance this presentation have been provided courtesy of the Ray Avery Estate.  The author would like to extend a most heartfelt thanks to Cynthia Sesso, Licensing Administrator of the Ray Avery Photo Archives.  Please note that these photos remain the property of the Ray Avery Estate and are used here with permission.  Any inquiries regarding their use, commercial or otherwise, should be directed to:  Cynthia Sesso at CTSIMAGES.

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

BUDDY DEFRANCO / LUCY ANN POLK

STARS OF JAZZ - AUGUST 6, 1956 - SHOW #7

COMMENTARY © James A. Harrod, Copyright Protected; All Rights Reserved


The TV Guide listing for the August 6, 1956 Stars of Jazz listed all of the members of Buddy DeFranco’s quintet that would be appearing along with the featured vocalist, Lucy Ann Polk.  Buddy DeFranco was appearing at Zardi’s Jazzland, alternating sets with the Dave Brubeck Quartet. The quintet members were: Buddy DeFranco, clarinet; Howard Roberts, guitar; Marty Paich, piano; Ralph Pena, bass and Frank DeVito, drums.  Lucy Ann Polk’s vocal numbers were accompanied by Roberts, Paich, Pena and DeVito.

Buddy DeFranco talks about clarinet playing:
"I'm often asked, these days, what I think about the so-called 'new-style' clarinet playing as practiced by Jimmy Giuffre and Buddy Collette. Jimmy and Buddy are, of course, wonderful musicians but, to me, they only play half the clarinet. I get what they're trying to say but I'm not sure that they are really saying it. As a clarinet player, it is sometimes a little frustrating to listen to. Actually, Giuffre gets a saxophone sound on clarinet - just like Lester Young's clarinet sound. Jimmy couldn't play baritone, as he does, and still get a real clarinet sound, in my opinion. I haven't played saxophone since I left Tommy Dorsey in 1948. It adversely affects my clarinet embouchure. When I attempt to play bass clarinet the same thing happens. Anyway, I find that the bass clarinet is not good for jazz. It is so quiet and has no punch like a B-flat clarinet or a saxophone. You know, whether you like their styles or not, Benny and Artie played the instrument from the lowest note to the top. I've also tried an alto clarinet. It's really an abortive instrument - not satisfying at all. It doesn't have the drive, fire or punch essential for jazz.

"I use a most unorthodox combination of mouthpiece and reed - a Vandoren mouth-piece No. 5 or 6, refinished myself - opened up myself - and a #3 reed. With a wide-open mouthpiece and a heavy reed, other clarinet players turn blue in the face when they try my instrument. I've had this combination for about two years. Before that, I had a closer Vandoren mouthpiece (about a No. 4) but the chamber was different inside. Also, then, I used about a #4 reed. I changed to get a better sound for recording. I use a Leblanc (Symphony model) clarinet. In my opinion, Leblanc wasn't a good clarinet years ago, but Vito Pascucci, who was with the Miller band in Europe during the War, met the Leblanc brothers in France. Fascucci's ingenuity and suggestions brought about a lot of tremendous improvements in the Leblanc design." 

"I left Joe Glaser and I've just recently signed with the Willard Alexander office. I plan to do college concerts almost exclusively in due course. Eventually, it's hoped to tie up a college tour by a larger Buddy DeFranco group with a show produced by Stan Kenton and Howard Lucraft's Jazz International Organization. For so many years I tried, without success, to get education authorities interested in the idea of school and college jazz. It is only this last year that they have recognized jazz properly as a serious art form." 

Buddy DeFranco © Melody Maker, January 5, 1957
(Photo: Jimmy Giuffre, Buddy Collette, Howard Lucraft, Abe Most and Buddy DeFranco at Zardi’s - photo from the Howard Lucraft Collection, courtesy of CTSIMAGES)



Buddy DeFranco entered into a long association with Norman Granz in the mid 1950s recording with a variety of sidemen.  His appearance of Stars of Jazz was released on the Calliope Records label some twenty years after the show was recorded.  Details of that release can be found at our blog devoted to the Calliope label:    http://callioperecords.blogspot.com/2012/06/calliope-cal-3015-james.html

Lucy Ann Polk was featured on Albert Marx’s Trend Records label in a recording made in 1953 with the Dave Pell Octet backing her.  Following her appearance on Stars of Jazz she would make another album in her own name for the Mode label and her appearance on Stars of Jazz would be included on the Calliope Records release along with the Buddy DeFranco performance from the show.

(Buddy DeFranco & Marty Paich)
(Lucy Ann Polk & Marty Paich)
(Buddy DeFranco, Frank DeVito, Marty Paich and Ralph Pena)

Bobby Troup Show Introduction

The production script for this show is missing from the Jimmie Baker archive.

The ABC network granted permission to the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service to distribute the Stars of Jazz shows to armed forces overseas via their transcription service. The AFRTS guidelines stipulated that all commercial content had to be removed from the program.  Thus the commercial spots for Budweiser Beer and Schweppes Quinine Water were removed by the transcription service.  The August 6, 1956 program was Show #2 in the AFRTS series, transcription master #AF-6501X dated July 26, 1957.


The photos that greatly enhance this presentation have been provided courtesy of the Ray Avery Estate and the Howard Lucraft Collection.  The author would like to extend a most heartfelt thanks to Cynthia Sesso, Licensing Administrator of the Ray Avery Photo Archives and the Howard Lucraft Collection.  Please note that these photos remain the property of the Ray Avery Estate and the Howard Lucraft Collection and are used here with permission.  Any inquiries regarding their use, commercial or otherwise, should be directed to:  Cynthia Sesso at CTSIMAGES.